IBM Shares The 3 “Cs” of Big Data

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There are the “Vs” of big data: volume, variety, velocity and veracity, but also Chris Nott of IBM in a recent article introduces us to the three “Cs” of big data. What are they? Confidence, context and choice. Today let’s look at his explanations on what each of the “Cs” mean.

Confidence.  Big data comes from many sources and most of the time to be useful it must be combined. Combining data is not an exact science.  There can be different data formats, definitions and variations in which the data is managed or stored. But, Mr. Nott points out a “confidence level” can be assigned so that leaders making decisions with the data can judge the quality and risk associated with the results. He adds, “the level of confidence that is acceptable is a judgment that a business needs to make based on the risk and effect of actions. And that judgment is a balance between what might result from poor decisions that arise from inaccurate data and the cost of making improvements in the provision of data.”

Context.  Big data grows fast and moves fast within an organization. Context is important not only for delivering the right information to the right person but also for granting the right access to the right person. Mr. Nott writes, “Understanding context requires understanding who is asking the question and why. And part of that grasp includes the role of the person, where that person is asking the question, what the questioner is trying to do and the purpose to which the results will be applied.”

Choice. There are a variety of tools and platforms available to crunch big data. IT must examine each tool and determine if it fits the purpose and needs of the business user. This “choice” is not one-size-fits-all and should be weighed against each groups’ needs as well as the organization’s governance policies so users have confidence in the platform choice that is offered.

The 3 “Cs” of big data help users develop a trust level with the data by first allowing them to understand the risks (confidence), then knowing the data is being delivered with their needs in mind (context) and finally being confident that they are utilizing a reliable set of tools.

3C's of Big Data - IBM
source: ibmbigdatahub.com