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IBM: AI 101

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A recent article from Tech Crunch by Devin Coldewey highlights an RFI response from IBM regarding artificial intelligence (AI). Mr. Coldewey writes, “The field of artificial intelligence is so huge, and the potential applications so numerous, that it would be folly to try to explain it all in one — no, wait, IBM just did.” Today we will look at some of the highlights from IBM’s response.

First, artificial intelligence vs. augmented intelligence. IBM prefers to speak to augmented intelligence which is the process of creating systems that enhance and scale human expertise rather than systems that attempt to replicate human intelligence.  IBM further describes their approach as cognitive computing or “a comprehensive set of capabilities based on technologies such as machine learning, reasoning and decision technologies; language, speech and vision technologies; human interface technologies; distributed and high-performance computing; and new computing architectures and devices. When purposefully integrated, these capabilities are designed to solve a wide range of practical problems, boost productivity, and foster new discoveries across many industries.”

How is AI currently being used?  IBM provides the follow highlights by industry:

  • Healthcare – AI is advancing precision medicine through its ability to “ingest” patient information and run it against vast stores of medical research
  • Social Services – AI can be used to predict resource needs from specific population groups
  • Education – AI provides new capabilities to design true personalized learning plans
  • Financial Services – AI is being used to ensure financial resources are utilized well. This can come from the advancement of the applicant approval process or through efficient weighing and processing of insurance needs against risk, costs and regulations

In particular for IBM what started as a contestant on Jeopardy, IBM Watson, is now full blown cognitive computing that can be applied to practical problems in a variety of industries.

Next week, we will feature more on the blog from IBM’s AI 101. Be sure to check back. Until then you can also read more on AI and cognitive computing here.